Digital vs. Traditional: My Experience Part 2 | ULOG #TWENTYTHREE

This was my 'breakthrough' in digital painting.  It may not seem like much, but this 'clicked' something in my brain. This was the first painting I did where I was able to get over my fear of working completely digitally.  I painted this as one of my pages for that children's book job. About 15 years ago.

This was my next breakthrough.  That first one loosened me up.  I did the initial sketch in my little Moleskin as tiny drawing, about 3"x 5" inches.  I scanned it and started coloring it in ArtRage.  It went by super quickly for me.

ArtRage was the program that kind of started me thinking about changing up my process.

In fact, my life drawing in tradtional materials improved.  This was a quick demo for a student where I sat and drew for him as I explained while I was drawing.  This maybe took a minute.  It went quickly for me because the thought of making mistakes never entered my mind while I was showing someone something.

When you are trying to teach a child how to make a free throw in basketball, do you think about missing the shot yourself? No, you keep taking the shot until you miss less and less.  You can feel when you're going to miss when the ball leaves your hand.  When you draw, it's the same way. Don't think about missing. Think about making the shot.

This was the old way.  The ideas behind it still work but it can get tedious and time consuming and messy. However strong the foundation is, it became a drag and not fun.

I discovered that I was having more fun, playing in class doing demos for my students.

ArtRage really opened the conceptual door for me to start playing and having fun. It was like I had a huge mental breakthrough.

The software was so easy that I felt like the interface was not in my way.  It was like I didn't have to learn anything new.

This image below on the left was a quick scribble scribble to get students to understand how to think about gesture. I think I used the marker tool on a textured paper.

The image on the right was just me switching tools. Here I'm using the palette knife.

The drawing on the left took about 5 seconds to do.  The drawing on the left was like about 2 minutes.

I wanted my students to understand how fast and free you could be painting digitally. So many of them were uptight.  It didn't matter if they were working with charcoal on newsprint or on a Wacom Tablet. The point was was to just get over yourself and abandon your fear.

Fear, as much as if not more than anything else, will stop you from becoming better. When you can relax enough to play, that is when you start to grow.

All of this, is just me purging my old stuff. I feel like I have to get all of it out there, out of my system before I can proceed with new stuff.

Thanks Everybody,
@PixelColada

ArtStation Behance dLive DTube Gab Instagram Patreon SteepShot Twitter YouTube

 


Frazetta Dark Kingdom | 8:57 Time Lapse Painting | Re-Upload

I'm reuploading this to dLive for my students. I'm testing to see if I can embed dLive videos on my blog. Apparently it works.

I found a painting by Frazetta that I liked and I did a copy of it. I painted it in openCanvas so that I could play back a recording of the painting and speed it up in Premiere.

I'm using a few different tablets for this.

Cheap - Wacom Intuos Pen and Touch(new version)
It's small and good for travel.

Cheap and good - Huion Inspiroy G10T Gen 2
This one is really great and wireless. Also small and good for travel.

Good but pricey - Wacom Intuos Large(old version)
This one works with the Wacom Art Pen which I love to use. When my Cintiq broke, I didn't want to buy another one
because they're so expensive. So I went back to using a tablet.

Razer Tartarus for Quick Keys - Razer Tartarus Chroma V2

Thanks for your support,
@PixelColada


Paintings my Teachers Hated

My teachers hated a lot of the paintings I did in class. These were all models in-class. The women did 20 minute poses and these were fast ass oil paintings. The men were done as 2-h0ur poses.

The reason I was able to these was because I spent the whole day painting these women.  What you're not seeing are the 5 hours of crap paintings that led to these 20 minute lucky paintings.

This one my teacher didn't think I was taking enough risks.

This one was another one where my teacher thought I was playing it safe.

I knew I was playing it safe.  You feel really fake when you do stuff where you know it will probably turn out good. There's no struggle and other people who paint professionally can tell that.

I am going to take a bit of a break from digital and paint more.  I feel the need to bust out some more traditional work. And I think I need to risk the possibility of creating some crappy paintings.

Thanks,
@PixelColada

ArtStation Behance dLive DTube Gab Instagram Patreon SteepShot Twitter YouTube

Master Copy | Frazetta – Dark Kingdom

Become a better artist by copying better artists.

Mastercopy | Frazetta – Dark Kingdom

Huion Inspiroy G10T | Razer Tartarus Chroma | openCanvas 7 

Years ago, I attended a Concept Art event where one of the presenters who I considered an accomplished professional revealed that he still did master copies. For him doing master copies was a method to remain sharp, learn new techniques or learn new software (or hardware).

My personal 10-year-old Cintiq broke recently and while I wanted to buy a new one, the new Cintiq Pros are due out in May. In the meantime, I needed to buy something as a replacement, but I didn’t want to pay Wacom prices for what would soon be obsolete hardware. By “obsolete” I mean “We no longer support your device(cable) you need to buy a whole new one.

I also didn’t want to buy another temporary Wacom device if I needed to buy another one to replace it shortly thereafter.

So I decided to try out the Huion Inspiroy G10T. This master copy of Frazetta’s Dark Kingdom was completed with the Huion Inspiroy G10T.

I like the Huion because it has a smooth texture, smoother than my old Intuos at my old job. It was also half the price. I can draw faster on a smooth surface with less texture to drag on my nib.

I had initially wanted my students to try doing this as an extra credit assignment, but I think it may be out of their comfort zone. Doing studies like this is akin to fan art. You’re only going to improve if you can begin to approach the level of your heroes. You will never surpass them because you will never become them. That should not be your goal. Don’t be disappointed if your work isn’t as good.

I intend to do a few more of these, to really get comfortable with my new setup. I’m still learning how to make videos, so bear with me as I Forrest Gump my way through this and working with Steem.  I'm hoping to earn enough to buy a new Cintiq Pro when they come out.

There are things that you can learn by copying the work of better painters and draughtsman, things that a teacher cannot tell you. You’re far better off trying to figure out how to do something on your own by running into problems yourself that you need to solve without help. This is better than being spoon-fed a solution by a teacher before you even run into the problem. The more you can learn to do this, the faster you will learn.

In school, I had a rendering teacher who would give us an assignment and not tell us how to do it. Only after everyone brought in their work, would he show us all the techniques and shortcuts. Learning the quick and simple to produce quality and reduce time was mind-blowing. Having had the experience of doing something the hard way and taking a long time to do it, we had a greater appreciation for time-saving techniques.

While in an ideal situation, you would want to use the same medium as the artist, in the fast-paced world of technology, it’s acceptable to try to mimic work in a digital medium. It’s cheaper to buy a tablet and download an open source or cheap painting program that it is to buy oil paints, an easel, a palette, canvasses, mediums, brushes, etc. Parents of high-school aged kids who are interested in art can spend less than a hundred dollars for a tablet(non-Wacom) and download a free painting program like Krita. The problem is that most parents of budding artists know nothing about art. They don’t know the wealth of free resources on the net and on YouTube.

It doesn’t matter whether you copy drawings or paintings. Spending the time to analyze the work of another, better, artist means that for a short time you’re walking a mile in their brain. It’s like putting on Jordans and figuring out how to dunk. The Jordans themselves won’t make you dunk, but they will help you practice. You won’t ever be Michael Jordan.

You can admire others, but don’t become a second-rate version of them. Become a first-rate version of you.

This requires practice.

The more master copies that you do, the faster and better you will become. When you do this repetitively, you can start applying techniques that you’ve learned to your own personal and professional work.

Malkovich yourself into your favorite artist(s) and absorb those lessons.

Thanks,

Sheff | PixelColada

Huion on Amazon. http://amzn.to/2CCruqK

Razer on Amazon. http://amzn.to/2yoxoKq

openCanvas 7  on Steam. http://store.steampowered.com/app/398810/openCanvas_7/