Sketchbook

Asian Cowboy

Here is a trick so you don't waste paint:  Do a small study first. This paining above is slightly bigger than life size.  You can see how small the study is below.

If you do a small study, you can determine what colors you are going to use, what parts should be in shadow and what should be in light.  It basically helps you plan and helps you to encounter your painting problems that you are going to face on a smaller scale. This will save you time and materials.

Doing a small study can help your bigger painting succeed without wasting a lot paint.

Good luck.


SalsaMagic

This is a portrait of a friend of mine.  He taught me a lot of my salsa dancing moves.

When I was dancing with his group, I had gotten below 200lbs. I would like to be this thin again.

I also haven't painted large like this (I think it's 30 x 40in) in a long time.  I also haven't painted in oils in a long time either.

This is pretty close to life size, and I question whether or not I should paint that large.

I think I need to consider the size of paintings in terms of how easy they would be to package and ship.

There was so much I didn't know back then. Still, I learned a lot from this piece, about the things I should and should not do regarding mediums and glazes.

I haven't worked traditionally in a long time.  Most of my work has been digital. I've been wanting to go back to working traditionally.  I might as well since this work isn't for clients.

 


Batman, Drawing | Painting | Digital

I started watching Batman on TV in the 1970’s with Adam West. It was a staple of my childhood.

Whenever I had a chance in art school, I would do a comic book piece. I would squeeze them into assignments whenever possible.

Sometimes, I would hire a model then turn him into Batman.

Batman w/ Cross.  15 x 20 in Oil on Board 1993.
Batman w/ Cross.  15 x 20 in Oil on Board 1993.

The method was to use a glaze of transparent color and liquin.

And I would also use them as a subject to do demos for my students when I became a teacher.

These demos were done in class.

I’d start them off with line and value. Drawing from my head, blending with turpenoid and erasing with a kneaded eraser.

Then I’d apply colored pencils to a copy and add a solvent like turpenoid.

Then I’d scan the colored pencil drawing and adjust it even further in Photoshop. Here, I made it darker and pumped up the saturation.

Batman Colored pencil on 9 x 12 in Vellum/Digital 2004.
Batman Colored pencil on 9 x 12 in Vellum/Digital 2004.

One of my favorite things about a teaching job is the free paper and drawing materials.

Thanks everyone,
@PixelColada