Digital vs. Traditional: My Experience Part 1 | ULOG #TWENTY

Back again with more art.  Sorry I've been away, but I've been busy.

This painting above was a school piece.  It helped me to get my foot in the door with some local ad agencies here in Vegas

This is basically the last of my traditional work before I started going digital.

These medieval paintings were for the Excalibur Casino.  They ended up being comps and the finishes were done by a more famous artist who used mine as the basis of starting his.

I wasn't good at backgrounds and I wanted the freedom to move my image around.  I wasn't very good with Photoshop at this time, but I was able to isolate objects and move them around. They were painted traditionally with physical paint, but I separated them onto layers so that I could move things around.  That's why they feel so "cut out." I comped these in Xara.

The would have hired him to do this preliminary work but he was unavailable. That was why I got the job. I liked being able to create shadows and straight lines in the computer.  

This stuff was still so new to me.  It was hard to transition from painting traditionally into digital painting.

I used filters and effects to help cover up the parts of the painting I didn't finish on time.

This was one I wished that I knew how to paint in Photoshop with layers.  I was learning as I went along.  

I hate painting text because the client always wants to change the words.  It's often better that text is digital when the words aren't yours.

This painting seems awkward until you realize that all the blank white space is for the words.

I realized that I could just paint the parts I wanted to traditionally then cut and paste them digitally into my assignments.  I could just photocopy my approved sketch onto colored paper and start painting on it directly.

I started doing this all the time with my jobs. Doing this became fun for me.

I'm kind of posting this for my students so that they don't get so hung up on their Wacom tablets.  I want them to realize there are a million ways to get things done. The most important one is the one that works reliably.

I also posting this so that my students can see how I slowly transitioned from traditional painting into digital painting.

My next post will be about my "breakthrough" paintings that got me into the mindset of thinking digitally.

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Thanks Everybody,
@PixelColada

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Paintings my Teachers Hated

My teachers hated a lot of the paintings I did in class. These were all models in-class. The women did 20 minute poses and these were fast ass oil paintings. The men were done as 2-h0ur poses.

The reason I was able to these was because I spent the whole day painting these women.  What you're not seeing are the 5 hours of crap paintings that led to these 20 minute lucky paintings.

This one my teacher didn't think I was taking enough risks.

This one was another one where my teacher thought I was playing it safe.

I knew I was playing it safe.  You feel really fake when you do stuff where you know it will probably turn out good. There's no struggle and other people who paint professionally can tell that.

I am going to take a bit of a break from digital and paint more.  I feel the need to bust out some more traditional work. And I think I need to risk the possibility of creating some crappy paintings.

Thanks,
@PixelColada

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Bisaya not for me

When I was very young, my parents made the decision to never speak Bisaya to me. Growing up in America, they didn't want me to have to struggle in school, being confused by two languages.

I grew up struggling with how to speak English based on my parent's heavy Filipino accent. And when we visited family, I felt like an outsider because I didn't know or understand Bisaya.

I'm still pretty slow with it. I understand better now than I can speak. But in college it really bothered me. When you leave home, you start to discover who you really are. It bothered me that I felt so disconnected from my heritage. As an art student, I did a few paintings about it. These paintings are from my last trip in 1993.

Preparing Lechon
Preparing Lechon
Preparing Lechon Detail
Preparing Lechon Detail

When I presented these paintings in class to my fellow students, no onereally seemed to care. No one could understand my experience from my point of view. I wasn't a good enough painter back then to express how I felt. But even if I was a better painter, I still don't think any of them would have cared more.

Selfie w/ Jeepney Painting

Now that I'm much older, I don't worry about it so much. That struggle is no longer one that occupies my daily thoughts.

Jeepney w/ Lamp
Jeepney w/ Lamp

My wife understands how I feel. She understands my longing for my culture and she can see how happy I am when family visits us. She's not Filipino, but she does what she can to make me feel like our house has a little bit of back home. She made that lamp for me out of paper. Both of them. Just little things.

My Uncle told me that "Love is finding someone who understands you."

Thanks,
@PixelColada


Lubricant

This was another painting I did in Advertising Class.  The assignments were very simple.  We had to come up with print ads for common products.  One assignment was to produce an ad for the laundry detergent that we used.  Another was for hot sauce.  This ad was for [WD-40](https://amzn.to/2r20o4F).  At the time, my focus was to do humorous pieces.  However, my technique(this was before computers) was to paint realistically.  This took a long time and the longer it took, the less funny it seemed.

In any case, if you understand movie history, you'll get the joke.


Sheff_HotSauce

This is an old piece I did in an Advertising Class in school.  The assignment was to come up with an advertisement for a product.  I chose hot sauce.  Oils and acrylics. I was still trying to get comfortable with my painting process.

There's something about painting with traditional materials that brings risk to the table and makes the project a little more exciting.  Working digitally, is fairly safe and convenient. Painting with actual pigments and brushes is more satisfying, but lacks an UNDO button.  If you make a mistake, you have to paint it out or fix it.

I feel myself being drawn to working traditionally again.


Asian Cowboy

Here is a trick so you don't waste paint:  Do a small study first. This paining above is slightly bigger than life size.  You can see how small the study is below.

If you do a small study, you can determine what colors you are going to use, what parts should be in shadow and what should be in light.  It basically helps you plan and helps you to encounter your painting problems that you are going to face on a smaller scale. This will save you time and materials.

Doing a small study can help your bigger painting succeed without wasting a lot paint.

Good luck.


Caesars Palace

This was  a piece I did for Caesars Palace for a promotional mailer for a Super Bowl party.  It's cropped down from the original.  In the original there was a gladiator facing off against this guy in a 3 point stance like two football players at the line of scrimmage. This part of the painting was my favorite. It was also the last time I painted in oil for quick turnaround jobs.  After this, I switched to painting digitally.

 

 


SalsaMagic

This is a portrait of a friend of mine.  He taught me a lot of my salsa dancing moves.

When I was dancing with his group, I had gotten below 200lbs. I would like to be this thin again.

I also haven't painted large like this (I think it's 30 x 40in) in a long time.  I also haven't painted in oils in a long time either.

This is pretty close to life size, and I question whether or not I should paint that large.

I think I need to consider the size of paintings in terms of how easy they would be to package and ship.

There was so much I didn't know back then. Still, I learned a lot from this piece, about the things I should and should not do regarding mediums and glazes.

I haven't worked traditionally in a long time.  Most of my work has been digital. I've been wanting to go back to working traditionally.  I might as well since this work isn't for clients.